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10 Science Stories Everyone is Talking About

posted: 08/28/17
by: Jason Ginsburg

New scientific breakthroughs and discoveries happen all over the world. How can a science fan keep up?

Science Channel can help. We've selected the most intriguing, exciting, or downright cool headlines to keep you updated and captivated.

Read on...

1. The Great American Eclipse may be over, but the science is just beginning. Astronomers used the unique opportunity to collect data from the ground, from satellites, from balloons, and from high-altitude jets. With the sun's glare blocked, scientists could study the shape and structure of the sun's corona, along with its magnetic field. The information will prove useful not only for our understanding of the sun and other star systems, but also for protecting telecommunications on Earth and astronauts in space.

2. Several American diplomats have left the embassy in Cuba complaining of bizarre symptoms, leading some officials to believe they were victims of a mysterious sonic weapon. The US government is keeping many details secret, but the predominant theory is that sounds either above or below the range of human hearing were projected into the embassy. The diplomats wouldn't hear anything, but their inner ear would sense the disturbance and cause headaches, dizziness, or other symptoms. Cuba has denied any knowledge of the occurrence, and the investigation is ongoing.

3. Another unsolved mystery? Malaysian Airlines flight 370. The plane disappeared in 2014 over the Indian Ocean. While search teams found a few pieces of debris, the aircraft has never been found. Where is it? And why did it crash? Science Channel's new series Mysteries of the Missing debuts with an exploration of the theories behind this enigma.

4. A team of scientists has just created food from four ingredients: Water, carbon dioxide, microbes, and electricity. The food consists of nutritious single-cell protein. Right now, it's a slow process -- two weeks to create one gram of food. But the breakthrough could mean cheap food created around the world with renewable energy, and result in the end of world hunger.

5. A Russian hacker has been reverse-engineering algorithms in slot machines to determine when they're about to pay out. With this maybe-not-illegal technique, his team roams the casinos of the world, earning up to $250,000 a week.

6. Speaking of Russia, new findings are emerging from a 30-year-old disaster: Chernobyl, perhaps the worst nuclear accident in history. Engineer Philip Grossman has gained special access to the site, risking radiation levels to investigate the causes of the incident. Was it human error? Was it American sabotage? Was there a Soviet cover-up? Grossman's fascinating journey into the site's exclusion zone airs on Science Thursday, August 31 as Mysteries of the Abandoned: Chernobyl's Deadly Secrets.

7. While the moon got all the publicity by blocking out the sun, don't forget about Jupiter. The Juno spacecraft has been quietly carrying out its history-making mission around the giant planet. After taking dazzling photos of the planet's Great Red Spot, NASA is asking the public to pick Juno's next photographic target. Will it be the feature known as the Phantom? The Rust Belt? The Stargate? You decide!

8. There's a new king of the dinosaurs -- at least in terms of size. Patagotitan mayorum has officially taken the title from Argentinosaurus. This new species and genus of titanosaur weighed 76 tons and was 122 feet long, nose to tail. Ferocious T. Rex looks puny next to these giants.

9. A team of scientists has released a report that says most of the world could be powered by 100% renewable energy by 2050. The scientists believe 139 countries, including the US, can completely transition to wind, water, and solar energy in the next three decades. The team claims this upheaval to the energy industry would cost about 27 million jobs -- and create 52 million.

10. Missed this year's eclipse...or just want to experience the cosmic wonder one more time? Here's a list of the solar eclipses for the next ten years. If you don't want to travel (much), the next big event in the US will occur on April 8, 2024. It will be visible from Texas through Maine. We'll see you there!

New scientific breakthroughs and discoveries happen all over the world. How can a science fan keep up?

Science Channel can help. We've selected the most intriguing, exciting, or downright cool headlines to keep you updated and captivated.

Read on...

1. The Great American Eclipse may be over, but the science is just beginning. Astronomers used the unique opportunity to collect data from the ground, from satellites, from balloons, and from high-altitude jets. With the sun's glare blocked, scientists could study the shape and structure of the sun's corona, along with its magnetic field. The information will prove useful not only for our understanding of the sun and other star systems, but also for protecting telecommunications on Earth and astronauts in space.

2. Several American diplomats have left the embassy in Cuba complaining of bizarre symptoms, leading some officials to believe they were victims of a mysterious sonic weapon. The US government is keeping many details secret, but there are two possibilities: sounds either above or below the range of human hearing. The diplomats wouldn't hear anything, but their inner ear would sense the disturbance and cause headaches, dizziness, or other symptoms. Cubas has denied any involvement, and the investigation is ongoing.

3. Another unsolved mystery? Malaysian Airlines flight 370. The plane disappeared in 2014 over the Indian Ocean. While search teams found a few pieces of debris, the aircraft has never been found. Where is it? And why did it crash? Science Channel's new series Mysteries of the Missing debuts with an exploration of the theories behind this enigma.

4. A team of scientists has just created food from four ingredients: Water, carbon dioxide, microbes, and electricity. The food consists of nutritious single-cell protein. Right now, it's a slow process -- two weeks to create one gram of food. But the breakthrough could mean cheap food created around the world with renewable energy, and result in the end of world hunger.

5. A Russian hacker has been reverse-engineering algorithms in slot machines to determine when they're about to pay out. With this maybe-not-illegal technique, his team roams the casinos of the world, earning up to $250,000 a week.

6. Speaking of Russia, new findings are emerging from a 30-year-old disaster: Chernobyl, perhaps the worst nuclear accident in history. Engineer Philip Grossman has gained special access to the site, risking radiation levels to investigate the causes of the incident. Was it human error? Was it American sabotage? Was there a Soviet cover-up? Grossman's fascinating journey into the site's exclusion zone airs on Science Thursday, August 31 as Mysteries of the Abandoned: Chernobyl's Deadly Secrets.

7. Don't let the eclipse get all the publicity; the Juno spacecraft has been quietly carrying out its history-making mission around Jupiter. After taking dazzling photos of the planet's Great Red Spot, NASA is asking the public to pick Juno's next photographic target. Will it be the feature known as the Phantom? The Rust Belt? The Stargate? You decide!

8.

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