Cool Jobs in Science: Nick Sagan

With an astronomer father and an artist mother, Nick Sagan certainly has the pedigree for great science fiction writing.

Cool Jobs in Science: Nick Sagan

Cool Jobs in Science: Nick Sagan
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With an astronomer father and an artist mother, Nick Sagan certainly has the pedigree for great science fiction writing.

Bathroom Break

Bathroom Break
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How do NASA astronauts use the bathroom while in their space suits? One thing's for sure, no astronaut would ever admit to wearing diapers.

Bottle Smash

Bottle Smash
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What happens when you smash the top of a sealed soda bottle? Kari Byron experiments with cavitation in this messy demonstration.

Dark Matter

Dark Matter
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To solve some of the biggest mysteries in science, sometimes you need a really big experiment. Dr. Michio Kaku explains what this huge laboratory investigates.

Rebounding Gelatin

Rebounding Gelatin
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What happens to gelatin once it strikes solid surface? Kari Byron plays with her food and demonstrates why gelatin is an amorphous solid.

Underwater Weirdness

Underwater Weirdness
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Check out how this elephant nose fish uses electricity to locate its next meal.

Gas Powered Fountain

Gas Powered Fountain
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Water and gas can do strange things together. Watch as Kari Byron creates a fountain using the highly-soluble ammonia gas.

Gravity Defying Liquid

Gravity Defying Liquid
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Can a liquid climb upwards? Watch as Kari Byron pairs up a liquid polimer with a drill to demonstrate the Weissenberg effect.

Karate Challenge

Karate Challenge
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Newton's first law of motion is demonstrated in Kari's karate challenge. Join Kari Byron in the lab for a physics experiment.

Monster Toothpaste

Monster Toothpaste
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Kari Byron is back in the lab, and this time conducts a crazy chemical reaction. See what happens when you mix hydrogen peroxide, liquid detergent, food coloring and sodium iodide.

Bed of Nails

Bed of Nails
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Ever wonder how people in the circus lay on a board of nails? Kari Byron shows how this is done using a laytex balloon.

Magnetic Boats

Magnetic Boats
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Watch as Kari Byron creates a power propulsion system without any moving parts. The same type of system that powers Kari's boat could be the future of space travel!

Test Tube Trickery

Test Tube Trickery
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The best kind of science experiments involve beakers, test tubes, and funky colored water. Watch as Kari Byron demonstrates just how sticky water molecules can be.

Human Conductors

Human Conductors
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What do you get with a light bulb in one hand and a tesla coil in the other, sending 25,000 volts of electricity through host Kari Byron?

Gelatin Fiber Optics

Gelatin Fiber Optics
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Did you know you can use jello to learn about fiber optics? Watch as Kari Byron demonstrates the basics of fiber optics using nothing more than gelatin and a beam of light.

Super Wind Bags

Super Wind Bags
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How can Kari Byron fill this long bag with air? It's the Bernoulli effect at work.

Clouds in a Bottle

Clouds in a Bottle
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Aren't clouds in the sky amazing? Watch Kari Byron create a cloud with a few simple tools.

Disappearing Water

Disappearing Water
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Kari Byron cranks up the chemistry by mixing water and methanol. Will the mixture have more or less volume than pure water?

Fire Sandwich

Fire Sandwich
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Kari Byron demonstrates a fire sandwich that leaves one burning question. How does the metal mesh capture the flame?

Cool Jobs in Science: Meteorite Men

Cool Jobs in Science: Meteorite Men
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Geoffrey and Steve, the Meteorite Men, use astronomy, algebra, geometry, geology, and physics to do their jobs: running around the globe finding rocks that have fallen from outer space!

Cool Jobs in Science: Mike Rowe

Cool Jobs in Science: Mike Rowe
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Mike Rowe might have the dirtiest job in the world! As the host of Dirty Jobs, he travels all over to see how everyday people perform dirty, but necessary, work. Find out how science plays a part in getting dirty!

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